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Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
that gave him more latitude with the conservative base of the party. >> woodruff: speak of boston, and other places, let's hear now from our colleagues-- actually, ray suarez is in chicago. he and margaret warner are at the two presidential campaign headquarters, but, ray, we're going to come to you first. are you in chicago, and that's where president obama is tonight. >> that's right. he's just a few miles away. he's not here yet. and neither are a lot of the senior officials from the campaign. i think they probably want to waito see a little bit more, but illinois senior senator, senator dick durbin is here, and there have been a lot of poll closings, a lot of projections, but so far no surprises. what do you need to see before you can really relax? >> some of the key battled ground states-- florida, virginia, ohio, and of course when we get in the midwest, a little closer to my activity in the last few months for the president, taking a look at wis cons and i know iowa. if we can get the job done in the midwest, and i hope we do glie you're not up thisickle. whn you don't have a race, wh
. >> we get a call from the boston police. and they say, "it's a mad scene down here." >> (chanting): we want ted! >> narrator: it was the night of their first debate. >> "we're going to have to get you an escort to get into the building." they had eight or ten motorcycle police officers there to guide us through the mobs of people at the site. >> narrator: it was 47-year-old mitt romney's first campaign. >> and mitt just has this big smilon his face, and he looks at me and goes, "boy, however this turns out, this really makes it worth it." >> narrator: the race had been close. romney needed a great performance. >> i don't think he had any idea what it was going to be like, because he had never done debates under that pressure. >> narrator: he'd gotten into the race because kennedy looked weak, beatable. >> at the time ted kennedy seemed vulnerable. it was a weak period for kennedy. he looked bad, he sounded bad, and in that way he was vulnerable. >> narrator: he was dramatically overweight. there had been trouble with alcohol and women. he'd mortgaged his house to stay in the race. >> r
of wrestling outloud with making these choices. knowing what we know does philadelphia, does boston, does new york have to use a changed municipal math to run its daily affairs because of threats of these kinds of things? joe romm? >> well, i think as governor cuomo said, it's a new normal but we have old infrastructure. i think if f you listen to client scientists -- if we had listened to climate scientists who worned, no could flood like this, that storm surges were going to increase as the sea levels rose because ofgob waming and because of more intense storms we might have prevented it. now i think we need to listen to climate scientists who are warning that sea levels could rise, two feet-- as you heard-- by the middle of the century but three, four, five and six feet by the end of the century. so our choices are twofold. we should reduce greenhouse gas emissions so we're on the low end of future warming estimates and secondly we've got to start preparing for the storms that we are stuck with, like hurricane sandy. >> suarez: he used the word "prudence. whats prudent at ts point? >> that
romney began his concession speech in boston. miami mayor carlos gimenez apologized to voters, but he insisted officials had done all they could. >> we had a very long ballot. it was the longest ballot in florida history. were there problems in certain precincts? without a doubt. >> suarez: and the county elections department said it was simply a numbers game. >> this is volume driven. >> suarez: late today, election workers in miami-dade county and across florida were still counting thousands of absentee ballots. delays mean the presidential result has not been made final. the state has until saturday to certify results and confirm who will get the 29 electoral votes. for more on the ongoing ballot counting in florida and the sluggish voting elsewhere, we turn to marc cuto,he "mimi herald's" political writer. and curt anderson of the associated press. he's been tracking problems in polling places across the country. i know conditions varied from place to place, but what were the main drivers of the really long waits to cast a vote? >> well, in the case of florida as your piece mentio
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)